Indigenous Youth and Decolonial Futures: Energy and Environmentalism among the Diné in the Navajo Nation and the Lepchas of Sikkim, India

Mabel Denzin Gergan, Andrew Curley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

In India and the United States, Lepcha and Diné youth are articulating decolonial futures that diverge from past aspirations. Rather than demanding big infrastructure such as dams or power plants, Indigenous youth forward decolonial visions that reimagine the landscape and energy technologies. In this article, we suggest that Lepcha and Diné activists are articulating a youthful decolonial futurity—a vision for the future where their generation and the ones to follow can flourish in their own territories and on their own terms. We propose youthful decolonial futurity as a prefigurative politics specific to Indigenous youth, who view their activism as integral to creating a future where their communities have more control over decision-making processes and their ancestral territories. What emerges is a consideration of the role of Indigenous youth in building a language and politics of decolonisation against the roles of power brokers, elites, and naysayers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)749-769
Number of pages21
JournalAntipode
Volume55
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2023

Keywords

  • Indigenous youth politics
  • decolonisation
  • environmental activism
  • prefigurative politics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Earth-Surface Processes

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