Intertribal Talking Circle for the prevention of alcohol and drug use among Native American youth

John Lowe, Jada Brooks, Gary Lawrence, Julie A. Baldwin, Melessa Kelley, Rose Wimbish-Tompkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a culturally based intervention, the Intertribal Talking Circle program, compared to a standard alcohol and drug abuse education, the Be A Winner program. Community-based participatory research was used to implement a two-condition, quasi-experimental study. The sample included 540 Native American youth ages 10−12 years old from three tribal areas in the United States. Data were collected at baseline, 6 and 12-months post-intervention for both the intervention and control groups using demographic, cultural identity, alcohol use, and drug use questionnaires. Regression models evaluated participants' improvement in decreasing alcohol and drug use and increasing cultural identity. Findings revealed that alcohol and drug use decreased more significantly among youth who participated in the Intertribal Talking Circle (ITC) intervention program than youth who participated in a standard alcohol and drug abuse education Be A Winner (BAW) program. Cultural identity also increased more significantly among participants who completed the Talking Circle intervention program. Native American youth ages 10−12 years old respond positively to a culturally based intervention for the reduction of alcohol and drug use. The findings highlight the importance of cultural values and identity and their significance in preventing and reducing alcohol and drug use among Native American youth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalResearch in Nursing and Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Keywords

  • Native American youth
  • alcohol and drug use
  • cultural identity
  • talking circles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Nursing

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